Campbell Drive to Snapper Point
Darkinjung & Guringai Country

1 h 30 min to 1 h 45 min

4.2 km
oneway

↑ 129 m
↓ -119 m

Very challenging
This walk follows the Coast Track to Frazer Beach, along the Geebung and (overgrown) Grass Tree Tracks. From the northern end of Frazer Beach, the walk heads across the exposed rockshelf to Snapper Point Beach, then on to Snapper Point (consider tide and sea conditions before setting out). From Snapper Point, there are more great ocean views and a lookout which views a large sea cave. If you have extra time, the side trip to Wybung Head is worth the effort. A very diverse walk exploring many of the highlights in the park. Let us begin by acknowledging the Darkinjung & Guringai people, Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present. 
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Campbell Dr. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Gate on Campbell Dr. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Coast track sign near Int of Geebung Track and Campbell Dr. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Geebung Track near Campbell Dr. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Low heath on the Geebung Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Boardwalk across the creek. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Up the timber steps. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Timber edging on the Geebung Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Taller vegetation on the Geebung Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
A section of the Geebung track more overgrown then most. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Walking through the low heath on the Geebung Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Thysanotus tuberosus (Common Fringe Lily). | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Lambertia formosa (Mountain Devil) on Geebung Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Wildflower. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
A glimpse of Birdie Beach. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Wide vista from Geebung Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Birdie Beach View. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Birdie Beach View. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Tall heath on the wide northern section of Geebung Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Ocean glimpse through the taller heath on Geebung Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Geebung Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Ocean vew from the northern end of Geebung Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Ocean Views from near Wybung Head Rd on the Geebung Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Clearing near Wybung Head Rd on the Geebung Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
gate at nt of Geebung Track and Wybung Head Dr. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Wybung Head Dr. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
view north from Wybung Head. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
View south from Wybung Head. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Upper end of Grass Tree Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Upper end of Grass Tree Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Upper end of Grass Tree Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Over grown upper end of Grass Tree Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
View from Grass Tree Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Overgrown track on Grass Tree Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
A grass tree on the Grass Tree Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
At the lower end of the Grass Tree Track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
View of ocean at the from the bush on Grass Tree track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Fazer Beach and Bongon Lagoon. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Frazer Beach Picnic Area. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Welcome to Frazer Camping area. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Table with a view over snapper point. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Track from Frazer camp area to norther end of Frazer Beach. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Northern end of Frazer Beach. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Looking south along Frazer Beach. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Crossing the rocks at the northern end of Frazer Beach. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Looking south west from Snapper Point beach. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Looking out from Snapper Point beach. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Some rubbish on Snapper Point beach. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Water on rocks at Snapper Point beach. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Life Bouy on the western side of Snapper Point. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
View from Snapper Point. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Snapper Point. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Memorial at Snapper Point. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Snapper point. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Snapper Point Lookout. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Sea Cave at Snapper Point. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
Looking out to the ocean from Snapper Point Lookout. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2010.
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Warning
This journey requires significant bushwalking experience, specialised equipment and navigation skills.
Please ensure you and your group well prepared and equiped for this journey.

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Safer Bushwalks
Tips on staying safe on track
Before you start any bushwalk ensure you;
• Tell someone you trust where you are going and what to do if you are overdue
• Have adequate equipment, supplies, skills & knowledge for the whole journey
• Consider the impact of weather forecasts, park/track closures & fire dangers
• Can respond to emergencies & call for help at any point
• Are healthy and fit enough for this journey
If not, change plans and stay safe. It is okay to delay and ask people for help.
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Getting There
Transport options and directions
Start (-33.1954093,151.6016268)
Mode Car (A park entry fee is required for driving into the park.)
DirectionsFrom Pacific Motorway Onramp
  • Turn on to Motorway Link Offramp then drive for 16.5 km
  • Turn right onto Kanangra Drive and drive for another 1.7 km
  • Turn left onto Campbell Drive and drive for another 670 m
  • Continue onto Campbell Drive and drive for another 155 m
Finish (-33.1862367,151.6279294)
Mode (end) Car Shuttle   Car   (A park entry fee is required for driving into the park.)
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Track Notes
Turn by turn instructions & maps
Getting started
From Campbell Dr (800m east of the intersection with Blue Wren Dr), this walk heads south around the locked gate, though a clearing then follows the 'Coast Track' sign along the management trail. After about 350m, the management trail ends, and the walk crosses a small creek using a timber boardwalk. The walk heads up a series of timber steps (where the track is now lined with timber) and across a small clearing, then back through tall dense heath for about 200m. Here, the track is no longer lined with timber edging, but is still clear as it soon bends left and heads up the wide ridge through the low heath, with great district views behind. The track continues up the hill as Birdie Beach comes into view (on the right) and, just after a significant left-hand bend, the track comes to the top of the hill with a great view down Birdie Beach (now behind).....
Turn map Directions & comments
Start.
After 1.7 km find the "Birdie Beach View" (on your left).
Birdie Beach View
Birdie Beach View

Birdie Beach View is an informal lookout found on a sweeping bend along the Geebung Track, north of Birdie Beach. The view south over Red Ochre Beach and along Birdie Beach is fantastic. Norah Head can be seen in the distance, past Bird Island. Since the re-vegetation of the track to Birdie Beach Lookout this is the best point from which to enjoy the view. A great spot to enjoy the coast.
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Birdie Beach View is an informal lookout found on a sweeping bend along the Geebung Track, north of Birdie Beach. The view south over Red Ochre Beach and along Birdie Beach is fantastic. Norah Head can be seen in the distance, past Bird Island. Since the re-vegetation of the track to Birdie Beach Lookout this is the best point from which to enjoy the view. A great spot to enjoy the coast.

After another 540 m continue straight.
After another 85 m turn right.
After another 25 m veer right, to head along Wybung Head Road.
The starting point of an optional sidetrip. An optional side trip to Tip of Wybung Head. To start this optional side trip continue straight here. On returning from this side trip turn right when you get back to this intersection. Details below.
After another 55 m turn left.
After another 840 m find the "Frazer Beach" (20 m on your right).
Frazer Beach
Frazer Beach

Frazer Beach is a 650m-wide sandy beach, facing south-east. The beach is a popular swimming area with a patrol service provided during Christmas, Easter and April School Holidays. The back of the beach is home to Bongon Lagoon. Up the hill near the road is a large car park, several picnic tables, an amenities block (with shower and toilets), an emergency phone and Frazer camping ground. There is limited natural shade, but the beach is a interesting place to explore and relax.
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Frazer Beach is a 650m-wide sandy beach, facing south-east. The beach is a popular swimming area with a patrol service provided during Christmas, Easter and April School Holidays. The back of the beach is home to Bongon Lagoon. Up the hill near the road is a large car park, several picnic tables, an amenities block (with shower and toilets), an emergency phone and Frazer camping ground. There is limited natural shade, but the beach is a interesting place to explore and relax.

After another 25 m turn right.
After another 50 m find the "Frazer Beach Picnic Area" (25 m on your right).
Frazer Beach Picnic Area
Frazer Beach Picnic Area

Frazer Beach Picnic Area is found at the end of Frazer Beach Rd. There is a great view over the the beach and out to sea. There are a couple of sheltered tables and more unsheltered tables, as well as direct access to the beach down the stairs. An amenities block is just above the upper car park, as well as an emergency telephone.
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Frazer Beach Picnic Area is found at the end of Frazer Beach Rd. There is a great view over the the beach and out to sea. There are a couple of sheltered tables and more unsheltered tables, as well as direct access to the beach down the stairs. An amenities block is just above the upper car park, as well as an emergency telephone.

After another 15 m turn right.
After another 45 m continue straight, to head along Frazer Beach Road.
After another 20 m pass the toilet (70 m on your left).
After another 65 m come to the "Frazer Beach campsite" (on your right).
After another 9 m turn right.
After another 35 m head up the steps (about 10 m long)
After another 410 m find the "Snapper Point Beach" (10 m on your left).
Snapper Point Beach
Snapper Point Beach

Snapper Point Beach is an informally named beach, just north of Frazer Beach and south of Snapper Point. The deep south-west facing sandy beach has a rock platform either side. Some rusted rubbish has washed up on the beach but otherwise the beach feels remote and secluded. Access to the beach is possible along the rocky shore line, but only during low tides and low seas.
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Snapper Point Beach is an informally named beach, just north of Frazer Beach and south of Snapper Point. The deep south-west facing sandy beach has a rock platform either side. Some rusted rubbish has washed up on the beach but otherwise the beach feels remote and secluded. Access to the beach is possible along the rocky shore line, but only during low tides and low seas.

After another 105 m veer right.
The starting point of an optional sidetrip. An optional side trip to Snapper Point Memorial. To start this optional side trip turn sharp right here. On returning from this side trip continue straight when you get back to this intersection. Details below.
After another 100 m veer left.
After another 85 m come to the end.
A gate.
About 15 m past the end is "Snapper Point Cave Lookout".
Snapper Point Cave Lookout
Snapper Point Cave Lookout

The Snapper Point Cave Lookout is on the northern side of Snapper Point car park (at the end of Snapper Point Rd). The fenced lookout enjoys views over a large inlet with a Frazer Blowhole and the large sea cave. The cave was mined for pebbles during 1975/76. Now protected as part of the State Conservation Area, the cave and this inlet stands as a monument to the struggle of power between the sea and the rocks.
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The Snapper Point Cave Lookout is on the northern side of Snapper Point car park (at the end of Snapper Point Rd). The fenced lookout enjoys views over a large inlet with a Frazer Blowhole and the large sea cave. The cave was mined for pebbles during 1975/76. Now protected as part of the State Conservation Area, the cave and this inlet stands as a monument to the struggle of power between the sea and the rocks.


An optional side trip to Tip of Wybung Head.
Turn map Directions & comments
Start heading along Wybung Head Road.
After 420 m head through/around the gate.
After another 80 m find the "Wybung Whale Watching Area" (40 m on your left).
Wybung Whale Watching Area
Wybung Whale Watching Area

The Wybung Whale Watching Area is a small clearing perched on Wybung Head, just a short walk from the end of Wybung Head Rd. The clearing on the top of the hill provides sweeping views of the ocean. A sign hidden among the scrub provides information about the migrating mammals. There is no shade or wind protection on this exposed grassy knoll, but it does provide a great spot to watch the migration. Northern migration from June to July and southern migration from Sept to Oct.
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The Wybung Whale Watching Area is a small clearing perched on Wybung Head, just a short walk from the end of Wybung Head Rd. The clearing on the top of the hill provides sweeping views of the ocean. A sign hidden among the scrub provides information about the migrating mammals. There is no shade or wind protection on this exposed grassy knoll, but it does provide a great spot to watch the migration. Northern migration from June to July and southern migration from Sept to Oct.

After another 165 m come to the end.
About 100 m past the end is "Wybung Head".
Wybung Head
Wybung Head

Wybung Head is distinct headland found at the end of Wybung Head Rd, and provides great views up and down the coast. Wybung is a local Aboriginal word meaning 'Dangerous Sea'. The narrow headland has sheer unfenced cliffs all around, and sweeping views of the ocean. There is no shade, or protection from the wind. A great spot to enjoy the pounding sea.
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Wybung Head is distinct headland found at the end of Wybung Head Rd, and provides great views up and down the coast. Wybung is a local Aboriginal word meaning 'Dangerous Sea'. The narrow headland has sheer unfenced cliffs all around, and sweeping views of the ocean. There is no shade, or protection from the wind. A great spot to enjoy the pounding sea.

Turn around and retrace your steps back the 670 m to the main route.

An optional side trip to Snapper Point Memorial.
Turn map Directions & comments
Start.
After another 55 m come to the end.
"Snapper Point Memorial".
Snapper Point Memorial
Snapper Point Memorial

Snapper Point is located north-east of Frazer Beach and is home to a memorial to 7 lives lost on this point in the ten years before 1979 (when the plaque was placed). Since then, three more names have been added to the memorial. Please heed the warning and avoid your name appearing here. Snapper Point is a popular rock fishing spot, with a large flat platform providing great panoramic views of the ocean. A 'Life Buoy' sign points to two nearby floatation aids if needed.
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Snapper Point is located north-east of Frazer Beach and is home to a memorial to 7 lives lost on this point in the ten years before 1979 (when the plaque was placed). Since then, three more names have been added to the memorial. Please heed the warning and avoid your name appearing here. Snapper Point is a popular rock fishing spot, with a large flat platform providing great panoramic views of the ocean. A 'Life Buoy' sign points to two nearby floatation aids if needed.

Turn around and retrace your steps back the 55 m to the main route.
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Terrain
Know the Hills, grading & facilities

Campbell Drive to Snapper Point


Grading
Class 5/6
Very challenging
Length 4.2 km
Time 1 h 30 min to 1 h 45 min
Quality of track Rough unclear track (5/6)
Gradient Short steep hills (3/6)
Signage No directional signs (5/6)
Infrastructure Limited facilities, not all cliffs are fenced (3/6)
Experience Required High level of bushwalking experience recommended (5/6)
Weather Forecasted & unexpected severe weather likely to have an impact on your navigation and safety (5/6)

Some facilities on route
Camp site: There is one 3.4 km from the start.

Toilet: There is one 3.4 km from the start.


Order of key facilities on route
ItemFrom StartName & link to notes
Toilet
3.4 km[toilet]
Camp site
3.4 kmFrazer Beach campsite
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