Bittangabee Bay to Green Cape Lighthouse
Yuin Country

2 h 45 min to 3 h

8.2 km
oneway

↑ 164 m
↓ -145 m

Hard track
This is the final of the three formal sections of the classic Light to Light track. This walk starts at Bittangabee Bay, where walkers can explore the ruins and and the scenic beach. The walk follows the coast through a variety of environments, mostly in open heath, taking full advantage of the coastal views. The walk explores a variety of natural splendours and human stories of triumph and tragedy. The walk finishes at the lighthouse on Green Cape. Let us begin by acknowledging the Yuin people, Traditional Custodians of the land on which we travel today, and pay our respects to their Elders past and present. 
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Bittangabee bay camping and day use area. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Signpost at Bittangabee Bay picnic area. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Back of signpost at Bittangabee Bay. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Track below road and camping area Bittangabee Bay. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Storehouse. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Ruins of the wharf. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Track around Bittangabee Bay south. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Bittangabee South Headland Lookout. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Arrow marker heading south og Bittangabee Bay camping area. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Stairs through gully south of Bittangabee Bay. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Sap of a tree. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Track through dry eucalypt forest. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Seed pods. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Light to Light walk. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Creek crossing south of Bittangabee Bay. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Creek crossing south of Bittangabee Bay. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Seed pods. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Service trail north of Pulpit Rock Rd. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Service trail north of Pulpit Rock Rd. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Signpost at Pulpit Rock Rd. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Banksias. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Looking North up the coast south of Pulpit Rock Rd. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Banksia. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Track through low heath. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Overgrown service trail. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Light to Light walk through heath. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Slightly overgrown service trail. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Track through the Melaleucas. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Track just north of Ly-ee-moon graveyard. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Ly-ee-moon graveyard sign. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Ly-ee-moon graveyard. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Green Cape Lighthouse car park. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Track to Green Cape Lighthouse from car park. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Signs and track around fence line. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Track along Green Cape Lighthouse buildings. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Snake beside the track. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Green Cape Lighthouse's solar panels. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Green Cape Lighthouse's Lightkeeper's Quarters. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
No entry sign on Green Cape Lighthouse gate. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
White metal tower below Green Cape Lighthouse. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Heli-pad at Green Cape Lighthouse. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Green Cape Lighthouse. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Green Cape weather station. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Green Cape lookout. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
View from Green Cape lookout. | Photo by Matt McClelland (wildwalks), 2009.
Downloads GPX PDF

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Safer Bushwalks
Tips on staying safe on track
Before you start any bushwalk ensure you;
• Tell someone you trust where you are going and what to do if you are overdue
• Have adequate equipment, supplies, skills & knowledge for the whole journey
• Consider the impact of weather forecasts, park/track closures & fire dangers
• Can respond to emergencies & call for help at any point
• Are healthy and fit enough for this journey
If not, change plans and stay safe. It is okay to delay and ask people for help.
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Getting There
Transport options and directions
Start (-37.2167421,150.0148564)
Mode Car (A park entry fee is required for driving into the park.)
DirectionsFrom Princes Highway, A1
  • Turn on to Princes Highway, A1 then drive for 1.3 km
  • At roundabout, take exit 2 onto Princes Highway, A1 and drive for another 27.3 km
  • Turn right onto Princes Highway, A1 and drive for another 6.7 km
  • At roundabout, take exit 2 onto Quondolo Street, A1 and drive for another 245 m
  • Turn slight right onto Bullara Street, A1 and drive for another 18.7 km
  • At roundabout, take exit 3 onto Mitchell Street, A1 and drive for another 18.3 km
  • Turn left onto Edrom Road and drive for another 5.7 km
  • Turn right onto Green Cape Road and drive for another 11.2 km
  • Turn left onto Green Cape Road and drive for another 4.6 km
  • Turn sharp left onto Bittangabee Road and drive for another 3 km
  • Turn left onto Bittangabee Road and drive for another 150 m
Finish (-37.2595414,150.0479313)
Mode (end) Car Shuttle   Car   (A park entry fee is required for driving into the park.)
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Track Notes
Turn by turn instructions & maps
Getting started
From the picnic area, the walk follows the sign to 'Camping Area 500m', keeping the car park on your right. The track leads below the road (above on the right) for some time, following the arrow markers to a signposted intersection next to the log road barriers.
From the intersection, the walk follows the sign for 'Walking Track' (not the same direction as the 'Beach' arrow) down the hill. The track leads down the hill a short way to an arrow track marker.
From the intersection, this walk does not follow the arrow marker but heads straight down the hill towards the water. The walk steps down to the water's edge where there is a roofless building on the right. The walk follows around the building on the water side, to an information sign.....
Turn map Directions & comments
Start heading along Light to Light Walk.
There is a toilet (about 80 m back from the start).
Bittangabee Bay Picnic Area (about 7 m back from the start).
Bittangabee Bay Picnic Area
Bittangabee Bay Picnic Area

Bittangabee Bay Picnic Area is near Bittangabee Bay and camp area in Ben Boyd National Park. The picnic area is a day-use only area with a few picnic tables, an electric BBQ and a pit toilet. There is a reasonable amount of natural shade, and is close to a car park. There is short walk to the beach and ruins at Bittangabee Bay. The picnic area is well signposted on the loop road near the Bittangabee camping area.
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Bittangabee Bay Picnic Area is near Bittangabee Bay and camp area in Ben Boyd National Park. The picnic area is a day-use only area with a few picnic tables, an electric BBQ and a pit toilet. There is a reasonable amount of natural shade, and is close to a car park. There is short walk to the beach and ruins at Bittangabee Bay. The picnic area is well signposted on the loop road near the Bittangabee camping area.

After another 65 m find the "Bittangabee Bay Beach" (95 m on your left).
Bittangabee Bay Beach
Bittangabee Bay Beach

Bittangabee Bay Beach, Ben Boyd National Park, is a small beach at the south-western corner of the bay. The beach can be accessed by a short walk from Bittangabee picnic area in Ben Boyd National Park. The yellow sand beach has a small creek and lagoon behind. The beach also has rock platforms at each end and is fairly well-protected from swells, being tucked away in the bay. The historic storehouse is visible on the shore to the right.
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Bittangabee Bay Beach, Ben Boyd National Park, is a small beach at the south-western corner of the bay. The beach can be accessed by a short walk from Bittangabee picnic area in Ben Boyd National Park. The yellow sand beach has a small creek and lagoon behind. The beach also has rock platforms at each end and is fairly well-protected from swells, being tucked away in the bay. The historic storehouse is visible on the shore to the right.

After another 55 m pass the car park (20 m on your right).
After another 125 m continue straight, to head along Light to Light Walk.
After another 255 m find the "Southern Bittangabee Point lookout" (20 m on your left).
Southern Bittangabee Point lookout
Southern Bittangabee Point lookout

Southern Bittangabee Point lookout is an unofficial lookout on the southern headland forming the entrance to Bittangabee Bay in Ben Boyd National Park. The lookout is not fenced or signposted and does not have any facilities. The lookout provides a view across the mouth of Bittangabee Bay and a short way down the coast to the south. There is also a view of the red rock platform below, forming a picturesque contrast with the ocean on sunny days.
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Southern Bittangabee Point lookout is an unofficial lookout on the southern headland forming the entrance to Bittangabee Bay in Ben Boyd National Park. The lookout is not fenced or signposted and does not have any facilities. The lookout provides a view across the mouth of Bittangabee Bay and a short way down the coast to the south. There is also a view of the red rock platform below, forming a picturesque contrast with the ocean on sunny days.

After another 3.8 km continue straight, to head along Light to Light Walk.
The starting point of an optional sidetrip. An optional side trip to Pulpit Rock. To start this optional side trip turn left here. On returning from this side trip turn left when you get back to this intersection. Details below.
After another 235 m continue straight, to head along Light to Light Walk.
After another 1.4 km continue straight, to head along Light to Light Walk.
After another 1.3 km continue straight, to head along Light to Light Walk.
After another 50 m find the "Ly-ee-moon Graveyard" (10 m on your left).
Ly-ee-moon Graveyard
Ly-ee-moon Graveyard

The Ly-ee-moon Graveyard is a stark reminder of the horrific accident on the night of May 31st, 1886, when 71 men, women and children lost their lives. The white stone and single cross marks the positions of the unnamed graves. The nearby plaque names the people who lost their lives - sadly some names where not known and these people are remembered only by comments such as 'one who had a German accent'. During the dark night, the lighthouse keeper and assistant heroically rescued 16 people from the sea, and were left to listen to cries for help though the night of other people who could not be saved. The mother of Blessed Mary MacKillop, the first Australian to be beatified by the Catholic church, was one of those lost during the night. The fast and normally reliable ship, operated by the Australian Steam Navigation Company, was a single screw ship converted from a paddle steamer when it was brought to Australia in 1876. The graveyard is about 300m north-west of the Green Cape lighthouse, which was operational at the time the SS Ly-ee-moon struck the reef and sunk.
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The Ly-ee-moon Graveyard is a stark reminder of the horrific accident on the night of May 31st, 1886, when 71 men, women and children lost their lives. The white stone and single cross marks the positions of the unnamed graves. The nearby plaque names the people who lost their lives - sadly some names where not known and these people are remembered only by comments such as 'one who had a German accent'. During the dark night, the lighthouse keeper and assistant heroically rescued 16 people from the sea, and were left to listen to cries for help though the night of other people who could not be saved. The mother of Blessed Mary MacKillop, the first Australian to be beatified by the Catholic church, was one of those lost during the night. The fast and normally reliable ship, operated by the Australian Steam Navigation Company, was a single screw ship converted from a paddle steamer when it was brought to Australia in 1876. The graveyard is about 300m north-west of the Green Cape lighthouse, which was operational at the time the SS Ly-ee-moon struck the reef and sunk.

After another 195 m to find the car park.
Turn left, to head along Green Cape Road.
After another 50 m continue straight.
After another 20 m head through/around the gate.
After another 20 m turn left.
After another 50 m pass the toilet (15 m on your right).
After another 6 m find the "Toilet" (on your right).
Toilet
Toilet

Unisex non-flushing toilet. Entrance is 85cm wide, toilet seat 39cm high, handrails 77cm high. Floor space is 1.5x2.4m. Tank water tap 1m high.
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Unisex non-flushing toilet. Entrance is 85cm wide, toilet seat 39cm high, handrails 77cm high. Floor space is 1.5x2.4m. Tank water tap 1m high.

Turn right.
After another 10 m pass the sign (on your right).
After another 115 m find the "Green Cape Telegraph Station" (6 m on your left).
Green Cape Telegraph Station
Green Cape Telegraph Station

Green Cape Telegraph Station was established in 1882. The station acted as a relay station, re-sending ship-to-shore messages from boats passing by. Ships, and communication staff on Green Cape, would use semaphore flags to communicate a message. When required, the messages could also be relayed using Morse code. The telegraph station is a white concrete building with a tin roof. The building has a blue painted base and is less than 100m north of Green Cape Lighthouse in Ben Boyd National Park.
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Green Cape Telegraph Station was established in 1882. The station acted as a relay station, re-sending ship-to-shore messages from boats passing by. Ships, and communication staff on Green Cape, would use semaphore flags to communicate a message. When required, the messages could also be relayed using Morse code. The telegraph station is a white concrete building with a tin roof. The building has a blue painted base and is less than 100m north of Green Cape Lighthouse in Ben Boyd National Park.

Then cross the bridge (about 15 m long)
After another 30 m find the "Cape Lighthouse Keepers" (20 m on your left).
Cape Lighthouse Keepers
Cape Lighthouse Keepers

The Cape Lighthouse Keepers' cottages is a large concrete building near Green Cape Lighthouse in Ben Boyd National Park. There are two cottages that have been refurbished, each sleeping up to 6 guests and boasting 3.5 stars. Each cottage has a fully equipped kitchen, dining room, bathroom, lounge room (with sofa bed), Master bedroom (Queen) and second bedroom (2 singles). The price starts from $250 a night per cottage. Bookings are essential, for more info call NPWS on 13000 72757 or online
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The Cape Lighthouse Keepers' cottages is a large concrete building near Green Cape Lighthouse in Ben Boyd National Park. There are two cottages that have been refurbished, each sleeping up to 6 guests and boasting 3.5 stars. Each cottage has a fully equipped kitchen, dining room, bathroom, lounge room (with sofa bed), Master bedroom (Queen) and second bedroom (2 singles). The price starts from $250 a night per cottage. Bookings are essential, for more info call NPWS on 13000 72757 or online

After another 150 m find the "Green Cape Lighthouse" (10 m on your left).
Green Cape Lighthouse
Green Cape Lighthouse

Green Cape Lighthouse is a majestic, 29 meter tall, white octagon-shaped, concrete and blue stone monolith, at the southern tip of Ben Boyd National Park. The lighthouse construction was tendered in 1880 and Albert Aspinall started construction in 1881. He built a timber tram line from Bittangabee Bay to transport materials. After having to dig footing much deeper than expected, in addition to dealing with workers' disputes, Aspinall went broke and his creditors completed the project. The original lantern was oil-fired and was visible 19NM out to sea. Today, the lighthouse still operates with a solar-powered electric light. The lighthouse buildings and grounds can be visited on a tour, otherwise enjoyed from outside the fence. The lighthouse was functionally replaced with a more modern metal tower 60m down the hill in 1992.
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Green Cape Lighthouse is a majestic, 29 meter tall, white octagon-shaped, concrete and blue stone monolith, at the southern tip of Ben Boyd National Park. The lighthouse construction was tendered in 1880 and Albert Aspinall started construction in 1881. He built a timber tram line from Bittangabee Bay to transport materials. After having to dig footing much deeper than expected, in addition to dealing with workers' disputes, Aspinall went broke and his creditors completed the project. The original lantern was oil-fired and was visible 19NM out to sea. Today, the lighthouse still operates with a solar-powered electric light. The lighthouse buildings and grounds can be visited on a tour, otherwise enjoyed from outside the fence. The lighthouse was functionally replaced with a more modern metal tower 60m down the hill in 1992.

Then find the "Seat" (5 m on your left).
Seat
Seat

A white painted timber bench seat, 27cm high, 20cm deep and 89cm wide with no arm or backrest.
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A white painted timber bench seat, 27cm high, 20cm deep and 89cm wide with no arm or backrest.

After another 20 m find the "Picnic Table" (25 m on your left).
Picnic Table
Picnic Table

A timber slat picnic table and bench seats. The table is 71cm high, 91cm deep and 2.5m wide. The seats are 49cm high, 35cm deep and 2.5m wide (no backrest). The ground on one side of the table is eroded.
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A timber slat picnic table and bench seats. The table is 71cm high, 91cm deep and 2.5m wide. The seats are 49cm high, 35cm deep and 2.5m wide (no backrest). The ground on one side of the table is eroded.

Then find the "Trip Hazard" (5 m on your right).
Trip Hazard
Trip Hazard

The boardwalk is slightly elevated and has an ungraded side with a 25cm drop to the side.
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The boardwalk is slightly elevated and has an ungraded side with a 25cm drop to the side.

After another 305 m continue straight.
After another 40 m veer left, to head along Green Cape Road.
After another 5 m come to the end.
"Green Cape".
Green Cape
Green Cape

Green Cape is a headland at the southern end of Ben Boyd National Park, forming the northern head of Disaster Bay. The cape's traditional owners are the people of the Yuin nation, from whom there remains evidence of a number of camps in the area. The cape was named 'Green Point' by Matthew Flinders in 1798. The area began its notorious fame in 1802 when eight of Flinders' crew disappeared when fetching water, in what he then appropriately named 'Disaster Bay'. The Imlay brothers and Boyd both established whaling business in the area in the early to mid 1800's, leaving several buildings in the park. There were many shipwrecks in the surrounding waters, the most famous being the SS Ly-ee-moon, whose victims are buried on the cape. The most visible feature on the cape is the 29-metre high lighthouse that is still operational today. NPWS run 1-hour tours of the site based on bookings . There is a composting toilet at the car park at the end of Green Cape Road. Accommodation is also available in the renovated lighthouse keeper cottages.
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Green Cape is a headland at the southern end of Ben Boyd National Park, forming the northern head of Disaster Bay. The cape's traditional owners are the people of the Yuin nation, from whom there remains evidence of a number of camps in the area. The cape was named 'Green Point' by Matthew Flinders in 1798. The area began its notorious fame in 1802 when eight of Flinders' crew disappeared when fetching water, in what he then appropriately named 'Disaster Bay'. The Imlay brothers and Boyd both established whaling business in the area in the early to mid 1800's, leaving several buildings in the park. There were many shipwrecks in the surrounding waters, the most famous being the SS Ly-ee-moon, whose victims are buried on the cape. The most visible feature on the cape is the 29-metre high lighthouse that is still operational today. NPWS run 1-hour tours of the site based on bookings . There is a composting toilet at the car park at the end of Green Cape Road. Accommodation is also available in the renovated lighthouse keeper cottages.


An optional side trip to Pulpit Rock.
Turn map Directions & comments
Start.
After another 550 m continue straight.
After another 85 m pass the toilet (10 m on your left).
Turn right.
After another 35 m continue straight.
After another 10 m head down the 33 surface|wood steps (about 10 m long)
Then come to the viewpoint (10 m on your right).
After another 10 m come to the end.
About 45 m past the end is "Pulpit Rock".
Pulpit Rock
Pulpit Rock

Pulpit Rock is a large rock platform on the south-east coast of NSW, between Green Cape and Bittangabee in Ben Boyd National Park. The rock platform is a popular spot for rock fishing. Pulpit Rock is accessed via a staircase near the end of a service trail off Green Cape Rd. Near the car park is a pit toilet and garbage facilities. From the rock platform, there are great views north up the coast, with the red rock cliffs providing a spectacular highlight.
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Pulpit Rock is a large rock platform on the south-east coast of NSW, between Green Cape and Bittangabee in Ben Boyd National Park. The rock platform is a popular spot for rock fishing. Pulpit Rock is accessed via a staircase near the end of a service trail off Green Cape Rd. Near the car park is a pit toilet and garbage facilities. From the rock platform, there are great views north up the coast, with the red rock cliffs providing a spectacular highlight.

Turn around and retrace your steps back the 660 m to the main route.
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Terrain
Know the Hills, grading & facilities

Bittangabee Bay to Green Cape Lighthouse


Grading
Class 4/6
Hard track
Length 8.2 km
Time 2 h 45 min to 3 h
Quality of track Formed track, with some branches and other obstacles (3/6)
Gradient Very steep (4/6)
Signage Directional signs along the way (3/6)
Infrastructure Limited facilities, not all cliffs are fenced (3/6)
Experience Required No experience required (1/6)
Weather Weather generally has little impact on safety (1/6)

Some facilities on route
Toilet: There are 3 on route, on average they are 2.4 km apart with the largest gap of 5.1 km.

Seat: There is one 7.8 km from the start.


Order of key facilities on route
ItemFrom StartName & link to notes
Toilet
-59 m[toilet]
Toilet
4.5 km[toilet]
Toilet
7.5 km[toilet]
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Articles
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