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Waterfall Valley to Windermere

Length: 7.7 km
Walking time: 2 h 30 min to 3 h 30 min
Climbing: 211m
Descending: 236m
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Overview

Start by walking back up to the main spine of the Overland Track and turn right, following the track along the edge of Waterfall Valley. For the first hour, you will walk through the dense heath and short alpine gums to the signposted (and timber platform) intersection with the Lake Will sidetrack. A great place for a snack :)

The sidetrack to Lake Will is popular and a perfect lunch spot, especially on a sunny day. If you leave your packs here (or really anywhere along the Overland Track) make sure you protect them from the Currawongs, they are really clever birds and will raid your pack.

The next hour and a bit of walking is through a much more open country as you walk across the plateau passing a series of lovely tarns reflecting the surrounding landscape. Going over a rise you see Lake Windermere and start the gentle walk down the edge of the lake. A great place for a dip, but first walk up to the hut and campsite to settle in. 

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Facilities

Creek Crossings
All significant creek crossings have a bridge.

Signage
All intersections are clearly signposted.

Toilets
0km) Waterfall Valley
End) Toilets are near the hut at Windermere

Seats
Start) Waterfall Valley
3.8km) Intersection with Lake Will Track (timber plaform that can be used as a low seat)
End) Windermere Hut

Shelter
0km) Waterfall Valley huts.
End) Windermere Hut

Mobile Phone Coverage
Telstra: Only patchy coverage about 500m south of the Lake Will Intersection (for about 1km). There is also patchy coverage along near Lake Will

Optus: No Coverage

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Track Conditions

The walk starts by following a timber boardwalk but the majority of the track surface is natural rock or gravel.

All significant creeks have timber bridges and there are a scattering of other timber boardwalks and planking sections.

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Hazards

The second half of this walk is more exposed to extreme weather (rain, wind, snow, thunderstorms and hail) than the first half. Deep snow and thick ice does accumulate on the ground during winter and other times of the year, making walking and navigation particularly challenging.

The first half is through the heathland and gum forest that provides limited shelter from the wind, but the second half is more open and exposed to higher winds and weather extremes.

In particular, if it is windy or snowy/icy conditions, avoid the side trips and take care to keep warm and stay on the track.