Tritensil Eating Utensils

A place to chat about gear and the philosphy of ultralight. Ultralight bushwalking or backpacking focuses on carrying the lightest and simplest kit. There is still a good focus on safety and skill.
Forum rules
Ultralight Bushwalking/backpacking is about more than just gear lists. Ultralight walkers carefully consider gear based on the environment they are entering, the weather forecast, their own skill, other people in the group. Gear and systems are tested and tweaked.
If you are new to this area then welcome - Please remember that although the same ultralight philosophy can be used in all environments that the specific gear and skill required will vary greatly. It is very dangerous to assume that you can just copy someone else's gear list, but you are encouraged to ask questions, learn and start reducing the pack weight and enjoying the freedom that comes.

Common words
Base pack backpacking the mass of the backpack and the gear inside - not including consumables such as food, water and fuel
light backpacking base weight less than 9.1kg
ultralight backpacking base weight less than 4.5kg
super-ultralight backpacking base weight less than 2.3kg
extreme-ultralight backpacking base weight less than 1.4kg

Tritensil Eating Utensils

Postby Aushiker » Sat 24 Feb, 2018 1:02 pm

https://www.tritensil.com/

A full-size usable fork, spoon, and knife (and the knife does cut meat) weighs only 20 grams. They also now have a mini version weighing in at only 8.5 grams. My daughters have been using them in their lunchboxes for two years now and love them.
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BackpackingLight forum.

Image

These look interesting and a better option than a Spork. Any users here?
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Re: Tritensil Eating Utensils

Postby Davidf61 » Sat 24 Feb, 2018 2:07 pm

I have a similar thing I scored on a Qantas? flight, spoon one end, reasonably useful serrated knife on the other, must be about 15/20 grams
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Re: Tritensil Eating Utensils

Postby ribuck » Sat 24 Feb, 2018 2:10 pm

My long-handled titanium spoon is 18 grams. I carry a lightweight pocket knife anyway, and anything I would use a fork for I can use my spoon for.

I've noticed that the size and shape of a bushwalking spoon is really important. Is it big enough that you don't spend all evening eating food one teaspoon at a time? And is it the right shape for getting the freeze-dried food out from the corners of the sachet? This blue one looks OK for that. Now if only they made a version that has the embedded ruler in cm rather than inches? I suppose it's for measuring the size of the fish that you catch.
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Re: Tritensil Eating Utensils

Postby Orion » Sun 25 Feb, 2018 2:54 am

I don't like the spoon having a knife "sharp enough to cut meat" as the handle. I also dislike the color choices. I prefer my spoon to have a neutral appearance.

As has already been pointed out, a set that weighs 20g isn't remarkable. I just walked to the kitchen and pulled out the nicest looking spoon, fork, and knife in our collection of disposable/compostable pieces. The knife is serrated and would cut pretty well. The spoon is one that I frequently take on trips. The three pieces weighed 17.6g.

Tritensil promises a life-time warranty -- free replacement if something breaks. That sounds nice.
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Re: Tritensil Eating Utensils

Postby MicheleK » Sat 22 Dec, 2018 7:16 pm

My Sea to Summit spoon weighs 8 g. I only need a spoon as I have long done away with need for a fork. Just shovel it in... :)
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Re: Tritensil Eating Utensils

Postby crollsurf » Sat 22 Dec, 2018 8:21 pm

I like the S2S offering but I like being able to pack my whole cook system into the pot I'm traveling with and found a foldable utensil is best.
I have a few systems that fit into a single pot, a UL 450ml pot that houses a metho stove, a bushcraft 750ml pot that hangs over a fire and a GSI Pinnacle Soloist that houses a cannister and stove.
Each one has a foldable Titanium Spork;
https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Titanium-Foldable-Fork-Spoon-Combo-Folding-Camping-Tableware-for-Outdoors-/123015015201?hash=item1ca4442b21&_uhb=1
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Re: Tritensil Eating Utensils

Postby Franco » Sun 23 Dec, 2018 9:28 am

As I mentioned in the BPL review ( I think...) I have tried the two sizes and found them to be better than the other types of sporks I have, however I am happy with my long handle Ti spoon and the Opinel knife that I would carry anyway.
For people that like a smaller packed volume and a long handle at the same time, the Tritensil could be a good solution
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