Tool of the Week.

Discussion about making bushwalking-related equipment.

Tool of the Week.

Postby vagrom » Thu 07 Jul, 2011 12:43 am

( with thanks to the Coodabeens).
Wild mag. used to have space for inventors ideas and Newsweek used to have a "New products and Processes". That recent gas cannister weighing device is a classic in the genre. I wonder if this thread could act as a focus. ("He's an ideas man." - Michael Caton, The Castle).

1) Tired of bent tent pegs? Slip in a 5" bright, bullet head, nail (24gms), to hammer a guide hole for your softer, aluminium pegs (the old Macpac ones weigh 17gms). Still useful as a peg in it's own right on at least one of the ropes, so one peg can stay home. Popular camping grounds can have notoriously hard ground as well as high,stony, wind-blown saddles.

2) Pot handle grips: Trangia used to provide a set of stainless steel grips with their smallest stove, a beginners, lightweight, simple model. With a 50mm paper clip, you can model a sliding piece that won't fall off the end when the grips are opened to release the pot and which make a fine, fixed handle when slid down to the business end. They had an unfortunately sharp edge at the open end but this is now kept occupied and is ideal for opening tough food packets. I asked Scouts a few years ago and presume they can still be ordered in. They were $10.
Last edited by vagrom on Sat 09 Jul, 2011 7:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Tool of the Week.

Postby Capt DropBear » Fri 08 Jul, 2011 1:44 pm

This is a good idea for a thread, I'd hate to see it slide into oblivion. That first idea is a great one, will certainly be including a nail in the peg bag from now on.

Although I can't think of anything to contribute to it right now, I think a thread like this would a great source of tips and tricks for new comers, and old dogs alike (learning new tricks).

Don't let it die peoples!
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Re: Tool of the Week.

Postby vagrom » Thu 06 Jun, 2013 8:14 pm

Sticky tape for your watch crown:
If the crown's unprotected then, as sure as eggs :wink: , it'll get popped when you start dragging yourself through dense bush. Not good for the watch. Happened so many times with my Seiko, you can almost set your watch by it.
The only way round it is some tape over the crown and around the face and back, for the trip's duration. A little roll of cheap stuff in your kit.
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Re: Tool of the Week.

Postby Strider » Thu 06 Jun, 2013 8:16 pm

vagrom wrote:Sticky tape for your watch crown:
If the crown's unprotected then, as sure as eggs :wink: , it'll get popped when you start dragging yourself through dense bush. Not good for the watch. Happened so many times with my Seiko, you can almost set your watch by it.
The only way round it is some tape over the crown and around the face and back, for the trip's duration. A little roll of cheap stuff in your kit.

My Seiko has a screw crown and is left-handed, so the crown is protected anyway. Is yours a divers model?
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Re: Tool of the Week.

Postby ILUVSWTAS » Fri 07 Jun, 2013 3:05 am

Tool of the week has gotta be Eddie Mcguire.
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Re: Tool of the Week.

Postby Zone-5 » Mon 06 Jan, 2014 2:29 am

ILUVSWTAS wrote:Tool of the week has gotta be Eddie Mcguire.


:lol:
... moved to another forum @ 10/10/2015
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Re: Tool of the Week.

Postby Tortoise » Mon 06 Jan, 2014 7:20 am

Thanks for reviving this thread, Zone-5.
vagrom wrote: Pot handle grips: Trangia used to provide a set of stainless steel grips with their smallest stove, a beginners, lightweight, simple model. With a 50mm paper clip, you can model a sliding piece that won't fall off the end when the grips are opened to release the pot and which make a fine, fixed handle when slid down to the business end. They had an unfortunately sharp edge at the open end but this is now kept occupied and is ideal for opening tough food packets. I asked Scouts a few years ago and presume they can still be ordered in. They were $10.

I've been picking my brain trying to come up with a lighter weight version of 'billy lifters', and here it is! I just can't quite picture it though. Have you got a pic, vagrom?
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Re: Tool of the Week.

Postby vagrom » Tue 07 Jan, 2014 11:58 am

I'll see what I can rustle up Tortoise. I'm still getting a handle on this tech stuff. ( :D boom boom, tshhhh)
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Re: Tool of the Week.

Postby Tortoise » Tue 07 Jan, 2014 7:35 pm

Ta, Vagrom. (I needed help myself :wink: )
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Re: Tool of the Week.

Postby Allchin09 » Tue 28 Jan, 2014 11:38 am

Are these the handles you are after?

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Re: Tool of the Week.

Postby Picaro » Mon 03 Feb, 2014 8:44 pm

I think this is the one....
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Re: Tool of the Week.

Postby vagrom » Mon 03 Feb, 2014 9:24 pm

Yes, thanks Picaro. They're the ones. Still sold in kit at Scout Outdoor but can they be got as an item? Fold a larger, sliding paperclip to make a handle that locks onto your Trangia pots. A small thing really.

Much, much, much bigger as ideas and weight saving goes is replacing your fancy Siggs and Nalgenes with a 1.25 litre Schweppes soda water bottle, backed up with a 4 litre wine bladder. Use the bottle to fill the bladder.

Tent lanterns like the Eco etc: battery life of LED head lamps (3xAAA's) means you can leave the candle lamps etc. at home.

Digital Scales : if you don't have any yet, they're well worth the investment. Mine are Homemakers from KMart for $40 some years ago. Flat, oblong, dull chrome. Takes a while to work out their idiosyncracies. They're super-sensitive but enable you to confidently micro-manage your weights. Knowing your AAA's are 11 gms (unused!) helps decide if you'll bring along 3 freshies and how this weight compares with an extra evening's packet meal, for example. (AA's are 24 gms)
My Petzl, Gecko and Walkman use 6 AAA's: 3, 2 and 1.
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Re: Tool of the Week.

Postby vagrom » Fri 05 Apr, 2019 12:09 pm

Simple water filtering, if not carrying a device.

Light weight. Half doz. kept in a Snaplock with medi-gear.
First straining with a clean textile/cloth.

We were heading east over the Ironbounds and out of water but there was muddy water puddles everywhere as it rained, some with quite enough water but really, uncollectably muddy. Tabs or boiling could help kill bugs.
We had some fruit and moist cheese so that sufficed for tea. In 2002.
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Re: Tool of the Week.

Postby Orion » Fri 05 Apr, 2019 11:14 pm

vagrom wrote:We were heading east over the Ironbounds and out of water but there was muddy water puddles everywhere as it rained, some with quite enough water but really, uncollectably muddy. Tabs or boiling could help kill bugs.


Similar experience on the Ironbounds, heading west. It was raining, windy, cold. We caught a chill and decided it would be better to stop. But the available camping was dry.

Plenty of puddles though...

Image

The grittiest stuff settled quickly via gravity. The next level down we filtered with a bandana. That was enough to render it quite drinkable (with some treatment), although it looked a bit odd. As cooking water it was as good as any.

How much silt did your coffee filters catch?
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Re: Tool of the Week.

Postby vagrom » Mon 08 Apr, 2019 10:04 pm

I've only tried this once at home, experimenting. It didn't impress but maybe one day it might work better. The filters are paper light so no great loss.
Earth can be either organic like coffee grounds or mineral, which would tend to plug up more. Or it's going to be a mixture.
My first impression was that it's just too slow to be really useful unless left o/night.
Another recent thought is that the liquid may need to be heated first in order to make the paper become effectively permeable to water passage, as with the coffee process.
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