Made my first SuperCat stove

Discussion about making bushwalking-related equipment.

Made my first SuperCat stove

Postby Moondog55 » Mon 05 Mar, 2018 1:02 pm

It works quite well considering how simple they are.
Has anybody got a recommendation for a small insulated base that is close to zero cost but effective? I used a small tuna tin made from steel and I experimented on top of the stove with the exhaust fan on high to better simulate conditions in the bush and I noticed that the aluminium baking tray I used as a support was getting very hot.
This is a bad thing as it reduces the energy available to vapourise the metho
Would using a larger tuna tin with some CCF siliconed to the bottom be effective as a primary windscreen and as a base? I ask before I cut up a cork place mat to insert inside the larger can or is the usual bit of plywood and CCF sufficient?
This will be for my winter hitch-hiking kit just in case i miss the bus again. All I need is a Cup-A-Soup in the evening and coffee in the AM so I would only have 100ml of fuel with me simply to boil water so the simpler the better I have aluminium flashing to make a windscreen and the pot is one of the spare ALDI 1200ml wide dixies
Ve are too soon old und too late schmart
Moondog55
Lagarostrobos franklinii
Lagarostrobos franklinii
 
Posts: 8947
Joined: Thu 03 Dec, 2009 4:15 pm
Location: Norlane Geelong Victoria Australia
Region: Victoria
Gender: Male

Re: Made my first SuperCat stove

Postby ChrisJHC » Tue 06 Mar, 2018 1:20 pm

I often use mine directly on the wooden tables that you find in many campsites.
It has never left a mark so I wouldn't worry about the base getting too hot.

The other issue you raise is reflecting the heat back into your pot / reducing wind.
You could look at cutting down a larger can, but you need to be careful that you don't block all the wind as you still need some airflow to make the stove work.

Note that I've just purchased a titanium Fireant wood stove for the odd occasion I feel like a small fire. That would also suit your needs.
It only needs a handful of small sticks to boil a cup of water.
It is not nearly as economical as a tuna can!
ChrisJHC
Athrotaxis cupressoides
Athrotaxis cupressoides
 
Posts: 375
Joined: Sat 25 Feb, 2017 8:22 pm
Region: Victoria
Gender: Male

Re: Made my first SuperCat stove

Postby Moondog55 » Tue 06 Mar, 2018 1:50 pm

I tried a third experiment last nite Chris, I made up a small insulated base and it burnt quicker and hotter and the water did boil faster. So I think an insulated base is worth it, not so anything else at this point, unless perhaps the ground was muddy and saturated wet in which case a bigger base might be needed. Titanium anything would be lighter than the old A-10 hobo stove
Ve are too soon old und too late schmart
Moondog55
Lagarostrobos franklinii
Lagarostrobos franklinii
 
Posts: 8947
Joined: Thu 03 Dec, 2009 4:15 pm
Location: Norlane Geelong Victoria Australia
Region: Victoria
Gender: Male

Re: Made my first SuperCat stove

Postby Franco » Sat 10 Mar, 2018 9:06 am

try a piece of plywood.
If your burn is still too fast, try adding a few drops of water.
Franco
Lagarostrobos franklinii
Lagarostrobos franklinii
 
Posts: 2668
Joined: Thu 30 Oct, 2008 6:48 pm
ASSOCIATED ORGANISATIONS: Tarptent
Region: Victoria
Gender: Male

Re: Made my first SuperCat stove

Postby Moondog55 » Sat 10 Mar, 2018 9:14 am

Franco wrote:try a piece of plywood.
If your burn is still too fast, try adding a few drops of water.

I siliconed some thin roof insulation foam to a small square of 4mm ply, 70*70mm, works well, weighs 18 grams
Ve are too soon old und too late schmart
Moondog55
Lagarostrobos franklinii
Lagarostrobos franklinii
 
Posts: 8947
Joined: Thu 03 Dec, 2009 4:15 pm
Location: Norlane Geelong Victoria Australia
Region: Victoria
Gender: Male


Return to Make Your Own Gear

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests