Sassafras to Wog Wog

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Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby Huntsman247 » Thu 16 May, 2019 8:44 pm

Undertaken in the first week of May. Just been crazy busy so only now getting around to posting this. Along with 2 others, I lead a small group from Sassafras to Wog Wog going through Hollands Gorge. I’ve always been curious about it and it surpassed expectations.
I decided to splurge on luxuries this trip. Despite my base weight being in at around 10 kgs, my pack was around 24kgs once camera gear and luxury food and gear was included. It's been a while since I've had that much weight but it was worth it or so I kept telling myself as I sat on my chair every night and enjoyed some good red. lol.

Day 1
Started walking in from sassafras entrance at 6.30.
About 8.30 we turned off the fire trail and headed down the foot pad towards folly point. Bits of pink ribbon, not tape cut at lengths of about 15cms stuck only on obvious parts of the trail every turn. After the first couple, I decided to carry them out. The foot pad is well defined and easy to follow for the most part. But a lot of trees are fallen making walking with a pack a bit more awkward. Where the grass was longer I managed to step on the head of a large snake (tiger? maybe). It was barely moving after that... Poor thing.
Glad I decided to stick the gaiters on early.
We arrived at Folly point at lunchtime and we're planning of setting up camp that night up on top. But after consulting the forecast while we had the reception at the lookout, we learnt that we'd get rain later that afternoon till the next day. So we opted to go find the CC SE of Watson's pass.
So after an extended lunch, we left to go look for the CC. After Watson's pass, there is a cairned route to the CC after following the cliff line E a little but not completely to the end of the trail. It's easy to miss as the well-defined track continues. We missed it the first day and ended up bashing a good part of the way down and having to navigate some small cliffs to the creek at Endrick 490960. We dropped into the creek a bit too upstream and had an interesting time getting past the slippery drops and waterfalls in the creek. It was starting to get rather dark when I noticed a faint track heading back up out of the creek which funnily enough was the CC. This was a bit after 5, so a long day. Glad we didn't have to settle for whatever spot we could find because the forecast was right and we were able to stay dry. There is a small creek next to the cave that had about 20 semi-continuous drips going for it. We filled up our bottles with ease using an emergency blanket as a funnel.

Day 2
We planned to do a day trip and go see sluice box falls but when the weather is really rubbish and you’re in a dry cave by a nice fire the idea of bush bashing all day through some steep terrain is not overly appealing... So we opted to eat food and relax. By lunchtime, the weather cleared up and I'd had enough relaxing so we decided to go part way and at least see Munnuldi Falls. This trip took us about 3.5hrs. We headed up towards Watson’s pass again following the cairns this time (way easier, lol). From Watson’s you head straight down where if you have a keen eye you can find a bit of a route but that’s on & off. Just before Munnuldi Falls, there is a lovely CC very close to Camping Rock Creek which is also your access into the creek if you want to cross it I think. But that's as far as we decided to explore settling for a swim in an awesomely large and deep pothole in the creek. How it feels to be clean!
Then we headed back to our CC and got ready for an early start.
The shrub can get really thick between the falls and Watsons but if you stay on the spur the vegetation is pretty open by Budawang standards.

Day 3
We followed a track on the southern side of the creek next to the CC keeping elevation till it disappeared. After 5 minutes of searching, I opted to just find our own way instead of fluffing around to find where this track goes. Funnily enough, this was the last bit of pink tape we saw too for at least a day. I'd accumulated half an A4 ziplock full of pink ribbons and tape by this stage! We started to head down toward Camping Rock Creek and eventually followed the second tributary down to it. From here on it was surprisingly easy going by Budawang standards again. Just follow the cks and at times walk alongside it needed switching sides as needed. Absolutely stunning gorge scenery at this point. I will definitely be back. There were a few campsites before the junc of Camping rock ck & Hollands. Otherwise, the only flat spot is at the junc of Angel’s ck & Hollands. This campsite is absolutely superb but it was only after lunch. At this stage one member of the group was struggling and was rather tired. But we needed to make our pick up so we pushed on. From that campsite, we followed the ridge straight up which saved us dealing with scrub. This took as a while. A lot of waiting on our tired party member. I was particularly not looking forward to this bit due to the rapid climb in elevation but even though steep, if you’re reasonably fit it isn’t really bad. The lack of scrub bashing made it relatively easy for a steep climb. Even with my still 20kg pack I never felt like I needed to stop going up the ridge.
At the cliff line just northwest of crooked falls we found a track that follows the bottom towards angel ck and an abandoned pack which turns out was left there a few weeks prior when a guy got airlifted out with an ankle injury.
The track hugs the cliffs turning west where we left our tired party member to take a look at the crooked falls lookout. What a steep decent to the lookout. 100+m loss in about 50m. Well worth it though! Not the place to have a tumble.
Once we got back to our friend and packs we continued to follow the track. But it was getting rather dark at this stage. The track seemed to disappear we made our own way again but it was pretty open rainforest so not too bad. We came across a lovely flat bit near Angel’s ck which was as far as we got. By the time we took our packs off it was dark and we needed headlights. It was only about 4.30 but the canopy and the steepness of the gorge made it dark a whole hour and a half earlier.
Somehow the red tasted so much better after the steep climb. haha.

Day 4
Went and checked out the top of crooked falls before pushing on. I'd planned a shorter day as I was unsure of the terrain in Hollands gorge and the fitness of the party. We continued through Angles ck until the cairns stacked in the middle of the ck indicated our accent. These days there is a reasonable track from Angel’s ck up to the track going to Don Jon’s base. The pink tape began again but you'll be glad to note that the area is free of it once more. Water from the CC at Watson’s up to the accent at Angels is pretty solid. Next time I think I'd bring a little carabiner and leave the water bottles empty for that stretch and just use my cup; attaching it to my pack.
There was a bit off water to be hear between the "splendid" camp cave described in the Rod Doughton book and the small sandy overhang further up toward Don Jons Base. The next water we came across was on the outskirts of Mt Bibbenluke in the rainforest area between its 2 spurs. From the intersection of the Mt Cole/Monolith/Don Jon tracks its pretty well defined footpad as most probably know all the way out to the Wog Wog car park. We headed west past Cole and Bibbenluke. I wanted to go check out Murrumbooie Falls but no one else in the party was up for it so we kept on going.
Just before the intersection arriving at the intersection to Yurnga Lookout at about CORANG 396927 there is a VERY well maintained track heading SW. Very interested as to where it goes. The first 20m seems scrubby but the more you follow it the better it gets. We didn't have time to explore it further.
We decided to push on to camp near the Corang ribs after taking a look at Yurnga Lookout and skipping the Corang arch as those in my group were pretty wiped. Has anyone used the pass just below the lookout? Looks like you could use the ridge below it to make your way to the Yarboro River.
We got to our camp just before dark and had a fantastic view of the night’s sky. We saw lots of meteors from the meteor shower we just had and not a single cloud to contend with.

Day 5
We had a lazy morning and was planning to go for a swim in the morning but it was a bit fresh so we decided to walk to the Corang Lagoon for a swim after warming up first. Glad we went for a warm up as the water was an invigorating 7.1 degrees according to my watch. We had lunch and dried off in the sun before heading off and getting to the wog wog car park by 2.50. No signs of signs or anything from the property owner at the lagoon. Day 5 was the easiest day by far.

A few items:
I'm curious about a couple things.
First, has anyone here been to Don Jon? Is there a way up to the summit?
Second, on day 4, near Yurnga Lookout, the well maintained track. Anybody know anything about it?
Third, The pass at Yurnga. Has anyone explored it?

A few photos attached.
Attachments
DSC_0002.jpg
On the way to folly pt
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Where we dropped into the creek upstream of the CC
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Perfect pop corn! BBQ flavoured!
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A new angle of the castle for me.
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Munnuldi
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A Creek
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Camping Rock Ck
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In flight entertainment
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Hollands Creek
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Hollands Gorge
Last edited by Huntsman247 on Thu 16 May, 2019 8:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby Huntsman247 » Thu 16 May, 2019 8:47 pm

I haven't gone through all my photos yet but these are some enjoy.
Attachments
DSC_0144.jpg
Hollands Gorge
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Hollands Gorge
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Hollands Gorge
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby Grabeach » Thu 16 May, 2019 11:43 pm

I can only answer your first query. The only scrambling route up onto the Donjon (only ever seen it written as one word) is at the northern end. My recollections from 30 odd years ago were that it was fairly difficult and one could possibly walk straight by it unless you were specifically looking for a way up. There was no cairn back then.
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby crollsurf » Fri 17 May, 2019 7:53 am

Thanks Huntsman, you've got me motivated to get back down there. Might try a loop and come back to Sassafras via Quilty/Hidden Valley instead of heading to Wog Wog
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby insect_eater » Fri 17 May, 2019 10:21 am

Thanks huntsman for the detailed report and set of nice pics. I've decided to head in to Hidden Valley area this weekend rather than the Corang area, as I've realised that neither of us have been there.
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby Huntsman247 » Fri 17 May, 2019 11:21 am

crollsurf wrote:Thanks Huntsman, you've got me motivated to get back down there. Might try a loop and come back to Sassafras via Quilty/Hidden Valley instead of heading to Wog Wog
You could utilise a bike then to munch out the kms on the fire trail. Leaving them at the gate.
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby Huntsman247 » Fri 17 May, 2019 11:27 am

insect_eater wrote:Thanks huntsman for the detailed report and set of nice pics. I've decided to head in to Hidden Valley area this weekend rather than the Corang area, as I've realised that neither of us have been there.
I'd be interested to hear what getting to pagoda rocks is like. Or what the way down between Sturgiss & Elliot is like if you explore up there. Every time I've gone to the valley (4 times now) it's rained with no visibility so I've never bothered with it and just kept going.
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby insect_eater » Tue 21 May, 2019 5:54 am

We did have glorious weather - still and sunny - even warm - and didnt want to leave the top of quilty's mountain, but alas, i rolled an ankle badly (tendons snapping with a crack) on a little hidden lyrebird-scratched undercut on the track just before the hidden valley turnoff. My first trail injury in four decades of hiking. After a restless night i limped and rode (one-legged) back to the car with single-minded determination after much joking about where choppers could land or the height of tree and density of canopy that the could winch through, and how to wangle it that the pack wasnt left behind. Regardless, it was a beautiful way to spend an election weekend. So i didnt get to explore around Sturgiss, or even get to Styles creek. Ill be back to do that and to look for my custom tooth guard that i must've droped some where on the track (in a small snaplok bag).
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby Huntsman247 » Tue 21 May, 2019 5:06 pm

insect_eater wrote:We did have glorious weather - still and sunny - even warm - and didnt want to leave the top of quilty's mountain, but alas, i rolled an ankle badly (tendons snapping with a crack) on a little hidden lyrebird-scratched undercut on the track just before the hidden valley turnoff. My first trail injury in four decades of hiking. After a restless night i limped and rode (one-legged) back to the car with single-minded determination after much joking about where choppers could land or the height of tree and density of canopy that the could winch through, and how to wangle it that the pack wasnt left behind. Regardless, it was a beautiful way to spend an election weekend. So i didnt get to explore around Sturgiss, or even get to Styles creek. Ill be back to do that and to look for my custom tooth guard that i must've droped some where on the track (in a small snaplok bag).
Sorry to hear! Sounds like you need taller boots. Lol. Hope it heals up quickly.
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby insect_eater » Wed 22 May, 2019 7:00 pm

Huntsman247 wrote:Sorry to hear! Sounds like you need taller boots. Lol. Hope it heals up quickly.

Thanks, it seems to be on the mend :oops: Surprisingly, i was wearing my stiff full leather full height Raichle mountain boots, any taller would be a plastic mountaineering boot. I cant imagine what i would have done to my ankle if i was only wearing a mid height boot - lucky i dont own anything that short.....
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby Huntsman247 » Wed 22 May, 2019 10:01 pm

insect_eater wrote:
Huntsman247 wrote:Sorry to hear! Sounds like you need taller boots. Lol. Hope it heals up quickly.

Thanks, it seems to be on the mend :oops: Surprisingly, i was wearing my stiff full leather full height Raichle mountain boots, any taller would be a plastic mountaineering boot. I cant imagine what i would have done to my ankle if i was only wearing a mid height boot - lucky i dont own anything that short.....
Gumboots are the solution! Lol
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby rcaffin » Fri 24 May, 2019 6:29 pm

I cant imagine what i would have done to my ankle if i was only wearing a mid height boot
You would probably have stumbled and done nothing to your ankle.
Those of us who have made the transition from big ugly dinosaur boots to light joggers generally do not have those sorts of ankle injuries.
Yes, it does take a few trips for your ankles to strengthen up - but that does improve your fitness. You won't look back.

Thought: if you snapped a tendon 'with a crack', I have extreme doubts that it could heal up without surgery.

Cheers
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby insect_eater » Sat 25 May, 2019 4:02 pm

Thanks Roger - been planning the transition for years, and always walk off the footpatch and across rough ground everywhere I walk (yes, I'm the person walking next to the footpath on the uneven and angled graound through the garden at lunchtime), and wearing nothing but jungle mocs for years (even climbed beyond Dakesawa from Kamikochi and back before breakfast in bald jungle mocs - much to the surprise of the mountaineering school practicing fall arrests on one of the ice slopes I crossed.) So my ankles are rock solid, hence my surprise.

Neither the nurses who assessed it (who said cracks/snaps were usually tendons/ligaments), nor the physio (who didn't do a full assessment) mentioned anything about surgery. Maybe I've mixed my tendons and ligaments up? Or should I be getting another opinion?
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby Xplora » Sun 26 May, 2019 5:31 am

All tendons and ligaments usually heal without surgery, even the achilles tendon. How well depends on a number of factors. Ankle sprains can be serious and take quite a while to heal. These are usually ligament issues. Ligaments connect bone to bone and tendons connect bone to muscle. Sometimes though a soft tissue such as a ligament or tendon can detach at the bone and take a small part of bone with it. This is known as an avulsion fracture and can only be fixed with surgery. Maybe a second opinion with a doctor and some scans. Most often you will told to take an ibuprofen type anti infam. These are not good for tendon repair as they inhibit prostoglandin. Tendons need the inflammation response in the first 6 weeks to heal. Hope it goes well.
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby rcaffin » Sun 26 May, 2019 7:38 am

All tendons and ligaments usually heal without surgery, even the achilles tendon.
This is I am afraid completely wrong - as it stands.

IF all you have done is strain the tendon or ligament then it should heal over time. You will limp around for a while.

However, IF you have snapped the tendon or ligament, then it will NOT heal without surgery. Having snapped an archilles tendon once, long ago, I KNOW about this. A plaster-cast for a month or so. (I was lucky and had a very good surgeon for the op - a long story with some black humour.)

OP said there was a 'crack', but that it healed over time. This sounds as though it could have been a ligament being pulled over a bone, rather similar to 'cracking your knuckles', and consistent with the medical response. That would be a strain, and the most 'fortunate' case. If so, lucky!

Cheers
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby Warin » Sun 26 May, 2019 10:20 am

insect_eater wrote:Neither the nurses who assessed it (who said cracks/snaps were usually tendons/ligaments), nor the physio (who didn't do a full assessment) mentioned anything about surgery. Maybe I've mixed my tendons and ligaments up? Or should I be getting another opinion?


A more qualified/expert opinion would be my desire. You don't want it going wrong. See your GP and ask if an experts' opinion should be sought?

Good luck.
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby Xplora » Mon 27 May, 2019 6:35 am

rcaffin wrote:All tendons and ligaments usually heal without surgery, even the achilles tendon.
This is I am afraid completely wrong - as it stands.

IF all you have done is strain the tendon or ligament then it should heal over time. You will limp around for a while.

However, IF you have snapped the tendon or ligament, then it will NOT heal without surgery. Having snapped an archilles tendon once, long ago, I KNOW about this. A plaster-cast for a month or so. (I was lucky and had a very good surgeon for the op - a long story with some black humour.)

OP said there was a 'crack', but that it healed over time. This sounds as though it could have been a ligament being pulled over a bone, rather similar to 'cracking your knuckles', and consistent with the medical response. That would be a strain, and the most 'fortunate' case. If so, lucky!

Cheers
Roger


I can point you to some more modern non surgical protocols for achilles ruptures. University of Western Ontario is one and Twaddle from NZ is another. As long as the tendon ends meet when plantarflexed and they are kept in that position for a period of time, the tendon will heal. I can assure you. I also have significant experience with this and know many people who got back to full activity following a non surgical repair of the Achilles tendon. Early weight bearing and movement is also recommended for the non surgical approach and re-rupture rates are as good as a surgical repair following the modern protocols. No cast is needed either but the leg has to be immobilised with a boot and weight bearing can start in a few weeks. Medical science has advanced somewhat since long ago so your experience may have been valid for that time but not as much now. Even though there are new studies showing the benefit of a non surgical approach, text books have not caught up, so many doctors still rely on what is taught at school. Surgery does not actually repair the tendon, the body does this by laying down collagen. Sutures hold the tendon ends in position until the join is effected by the body healing the tendon. Old school thought would be if you are fit and active then you have surgery but if more sedentary then conservative treatment was recommended (usually older people).

As I said, when the soft tissue detaches from the bone you will require surgery as the body cannot heal that.
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby Xplora » Mon 27 May, 2019 6:36 am

rcaffin wrote:All tendons and ligaments usually heal without surgery, even the achilles tendon.
This is I am afraid completely wrong - as it stands.

IF all you have done is strain the tendon or ligament then it should heal over time. You will limp around for a while.

However, IF you have snapped the tendon or ligament, then it will NOT heal without surgery. Having snapped an archilles tendon once, long ago, I KNOW about this. A plaster-cast for a month or so. (I was lucky and had a very good surgeon for the op - a long story with some black humour.)

OP said there was a 'crack', but that it healed over time. This sounds as though it could have been a ligament being pulled over a bone, rather similar to 'cracking your knuckles', and consistent with the medical response. That would be a strain, and the most 'fortunate' case. If so, lucky!

Cheers
Roger


I can point you to some more modern non surgical protocols for achilles ruptures. University of Western Ontario is one and Twaddle from NZ is another. As long as the tendon ends meet when plantarflexed and they are kept in that position for a period of time, the tendon will heal. I can assure you. I also have significant experience with this and know many people who got back to full activity following a non surgical repair of the Achilles tendon. Early weight bearing and movement is also recommended for the non surgical approach and re-rupture rates are as good as a surgical repair following the modern protocols. No cast is needed either but the leg has to be immobilised with a boot and weight bearing can start in a few weeks. Medical science has advanced somewhat since long ago so your experience may have been valid for that time but not as much now. Even though there are new studies showing the benefit of a non surgical approach, text books have not caught up, so many doctors still rely on what is taught at school. Surgery does not actually repair the tendon, the body does this by laying down collagen. Sutures hold the tendon ends in position until the join is effected by the body healing the tendon. Old school thought would be if you are fit and active then you have surgery but if more sedentary then conservative treatment was recommended (usually older people).

As I said, when the soft tissue detaches from the bone you will require surgery as the body cannot heal that.
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby rcaffin » Mon 27 May, 2019 7:44 am

Forgive my doubts.
According to the surgeon, many ruptured Archilles tendons end up with the muscle fully contracted and the snapped end 50 - 100 mm away from the heel. He was delighted to repair mine because it had been done 2 hours earlier, and was all clean and fresh.

Apparently quite a few cases wait a week or so in the hope it will 'fix up', so by the time he finally gets to see the injury, there is all sorts of damage around the ruptured ends. They have started to stick to other bits of the ankle. Very messy! So non-surgical repair of a full rupture is highly unlikely, although non-surgical repair of a partial tear could be realistic.

You will know when you have a full rupture. There is this great big depression above the heel where the tendon used to be. The admitting nurse in the ER dept gave it a poke to confirm, and said 'Oh Yuk' when her finger went right in. Honest! Funny thing was, it did not really hurt.

Cheers
Roger
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby FionaShedden » Tue 28 May, 2019 11:44 am

Thanks Huntsman - great report.

Sounds like the tracks were still mostly pretty good. Have to put this one on my list to do again!

I'd heard that the "route" from Folly to Sluice Box was pretty rough and very hard in places with thick scrub. Interesting to hear your experience going part ways that there was evidence of a route but not in good condition. I have only come in to SB falls via Pagoda Rocks as a day trip out from Hidden Valley which was relatively easy, but never over to Munnuldi. Might be worth a visit next time I head out to Folly.

That camp site at Hollands - Angel confluence is amazing, we didn't camp there either but I still remember it and have wanted to go back for years.

Interested to hear about the track off near Yurnga Lookout. Not one I was aware of...my old sketch map shows a line of cliff/outcrop around that area that isn't on the topo - maybe another good camp cave up there?
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby tom_brennan » Tue 28 May, 2019 1:48 pm

rcaffin wrote:So non-surgical repair of a full rupture is highly unlikely, although non-surgical repair of a partial tear could be realistic.


As Xplora says, thinking on surgery for achilles tendon repair has definitely evolved in recent years. I ruptured mine in 2006, and the thinking then was definitely surgery for younger people, but possibly non-surgical repair for older people. And my physio and surgeon also mentioned the issue of the tendon ends getting too far apart.

But randomised trials have shown similar long term outcomes for surgery/non-surgery, and as with any surgery, there are risks in the surgery itself.
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby Walk_fat boy_walk » Tue 28 May, 2019 2:24 pm

FionaShedden wrote:
Interested to hear about the track off near Yurnga Lookout. Not one I was aware of...my old sketch map shows a line of cliff/outcrop around that area that isn't on the topo - maybe another good camp cave up there?


Curious about that as well. Might have to check it out next time I'm up that way. Cave suggestion is a logical one... Alternatively maybe (admittedly without consulting a map) could lead to a view of the somewhat reclusive Murrurundi (?) Falls.

Brilliant report btw - thanks

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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby Walk_fat boy_walk » Tue 28 May, 2019 3:51 pm

Walk_fat boy_walk wrote:
FionaShedden wrote:
Interested to hear about the track off near Yurnga Lookout. Not one I was aware of...my old sketch map shows a line of cliff/outcrop around that area that isn't on the topo - maybe another good camp cave up there?


Curious about that as well. Might have to check it out next time I'm up that way. Cave suggestion is a logical one... Alternatively maybe (admittedly without consulting a map) could lead to a view of the somewhat reclusive Murrurundi (?) Falls.

Brilliant report btw - thanks

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Sorry meant murrumbooee falls (I think)

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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby Warin » Tue 28 May, 2019 4:56 pm

Humm

Murrumbooee Cascades - Rapids - Glen Innes Severn
Murrumbooee Creek - Creek - Hornsby

Murrurundi - upper hunter area

---------------
You want Munnuldi Falls
http://www.gnb.nsw.gov.au/place_naming/ ... ujjLFxWAIt
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby Walk_fat boy_walk » Tue 28 May, 2019 5:04 pm

No I mean Murrumbooie falls (with an ie not ee... Wasn't sure of the spelling) at the head of Murrumbooie Creek, a tributary of the Yadboro. Munnuldi falls (which I do know about) is up near Folly Point. Google doesn't know everything.

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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby Warin » Tue 28 May, 2019 6:13 pm

Walk_fat boy_walk wrote:No I mean Murrumbooie falls (with an ie not ee... Wasn't sure of the spelling) at the head of Murrumbooie Creek, a tributary of the Yadboro. Munnuldi falls (which I do know about) is up near Folly Point. Google doesn't know everything.


Not using giggle...
NSW Geographical names board http://www.gnb.nsw.gov.au/place_naming/placename_search

http://www.gnb.nsw.gov.au/place_naming/ ... ujjLZxZTIt

And, no even they don't know everything... :wink:
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby Huntsman247 » Tue 28 May, 2019 10:17 pm

Warin wrote:
Walk_fat boy_walk wrote:No I mean Murrumbooie falls (with an ie not ee... Wasn't sure of the spelling) at the head of Murrumbooie Creek, a tributary of the Yadboro. Munnuldi falls (which I do know about) is up near Folly Point. Google doesn't know everything.


Not using giggle...
NSW Geographical names board http://www.gnb.nsw.gov.au/place_naming/placename_search

http://www.gnb.nsw.gov.au/place_naming/ ... ujjLZxZTIt

And, no even they don't know everything... :wink:
Murrumbooie is on the topo. lol
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby Huntsman247 » Tue 28 May, 2019 10:56 pm

Interesting to hear about the access to SB falls from pagoda rocks Fiona. What's the pass/access like coming off the SE side of sturgiss? Looking at the terrain and where the sketch map route recommends you go, from folly point. It looks like a hard effort. But I'm keen to give it another go.
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby rwildman » Sat 29 Jun, 2019 6:19 pm

Thanks for the interesting report. You certainly deserved the red wine breaks as these were longish distances you describe. 1. The Yurnga lookout turnoff is just that - and it only goes a short way to the end of the rock outcrop. 2. From about half way up Holland Gorge, you can scale up the ridge which comes in next to Kirkpatrick Creek but it does have a small cliff half way up which must be skirted. This ridge leads up to Mt Elliot and you can traverse across to the saddle between it and Mt Sturgis (complete with Budawangs scrub all the way to the top). But you could also use it to get to Sluice Box Falls if you camp in the saddle (there's a creek with a cave nearby). 3. I wrote to the National Parks office in Milton about the private landowner's restrictions of the Corang Lagoon and they hadn't been able to ascertain whether it was permanent or not. Sounds like you were able to go through there just like normal. 4. I noticed last time I went in through Folly Point that since the closure of the Newhaven Gap end point (ie. the 7km road bash) the track down to the Holland Creek gorge had become somewhat indistinct when it used to be much clearer. Guess people aren't coming in this way so much. Last time we came that way we rode the first 7 kms on bikes and left them in the bush for the return trip but it is not easy to ride a mountain bike on dirt with an 18-20kg pack so maybe the walk is the best way. Thanks again for sharing your adventure.
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Re: Sassafras to Wog Wog

Postby bernieq » Tue 23 Jul, 2019 11:38 am

Thanks for the report, huntsman247 - lots of useful info.

I didn't notice a side track east of Yurnga t/o when we came through in Sep last year - although we were heading NE (up) and it was wet & miserable so perhaps not surprising. The track does bifurcate in that area and NE/SW is the general direction of the track.

Re the route up from Angel Creek, your description sounded a little different to mine (or maybe just me not following very well) - I've attached a screenshot of what I have - is that essentially the same as your route?

Angel ck.jpg

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